Safety & Mobility in the Downtown Core Project

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Google map image of downtown core with Cooper and Galena highlighted

Project Information:

The “Safety and Mobility in the Core” project is a vision for a safe, connected, and active downtown core in Aspen.

For over a year, the City of Aspen has been exploring how right-of-way (ROW) space could be allocated differently to increase safety for all pedestrians, cyclists, and drivers. Whatever your mode of transportation, predictable behavior and communication with your fellow travelers are among the best ways to enhance safety; how space is used can reduce the risk of an unexpected situation and support safer traveling behaviors.

Staff also has looked at how the ROW space use could

Project Information:

The “Safety and Mobility in the Core” project is a vision for a safe, connected, and active downtown core in Aspen.

For over a year, the City of Aspen has been exploring how right-of-way (ROW) space could be allocated differently to increase safety for all pedestrians, cyclists, and drivers. Whatever your mode of transportation, predictable behavior and communication with your fellow travelers are among the best ways to enhance safety; how space is used can reduce the risk of an unexpected situation and support safer traveling behaviors.

Staff also has looked at how the ROW space use could improve mobility and connectivity, invite vitality into the public ROW, and prioritize transit and/or shared mobility options in the Downtown Core.

The project team has followed up on Council direction and incorporated feedback from various public engagement opportunities such as questionnaires and focus groups as they refined concepts regarding a Living Lab in the core for Summer 2022. This proposal includes a range of options from a plan to test on Galena and Cooper to parking and transit programming enhancements to help mitigate any potential negative impacts.

As the city refines the living lab proposal, community members input on all these elements are needed. Please take the survey below or leave us an idea, comment, or question so all voices can be heard and input collected for consideration.

Currently, the team is preparing to bring the project back to Council in February and invites you to get reacquainted with the project, review work progress to date, and share your input and ideas on a proposed preferred option for implementation this summer.


Parking Considerations:

Part of prioritizing space is looking at how to allocate it for pedestrians, cyclists, and vehicles, options which also involve discussions on parking such as spaces along Galena and Cooper. The current proposed plan available for feedback now does not propose removing parking spaces from the core, although distribution may look different. The proposed living lab maintains parking spaces, so someone can drive into the core and find parking if they choose that mode of transportation. It also proposes addressing direct impact of parking in areas through mitigation and programming options. For example, the city is exploring reclassifying spaces in the commercial core area or adjacent to the boundary from residential to core parking spaces. This approach could generate 47 core parking spaces by reclassifying these areas for a net gain of three spaces in the core area. Programming approaches could include options like enhancements to the valet parking program, progressive timing based on locations (e.g., reducing the time allowed to park in one spot based on turnover demand needs), progressive fees (higher fees in higher use areas), limiting construction parking, adding pick-up/drop-off spaces.


For reference, the city observes a consistent 85% occupancy level on parking in the core. This figure is calculated by comparing the number of spots used through payment tracking with the number of total spots available. What that means is that usually, there are 15% of the parking spaces in the core available for someone to park in. This may not be right in front of the business someone is headed to, but parking in the core can be found.

How to Participate:

  • Subscribe to receive project updates
  • Take the 2022 Winter Questionnaire
  • Volunteer to participate in a small focus group
  • Share your questions and comments below through the "Question and Comments" tab
  • Email Project Manager, PJ Murray, Civil Engineer at pj.murray@cityofaspen.com
  • For over a year, the City of Aspen has been exploring how right-of-way (ROW) space could be allocated differently to increase safety for all pedestrians, cyclists, and drivers. The “Safety and Mobility in the Downtown Core” project is a vision for a safe, connected, and active downtown core in Aspen.  

    Incorporating the feedback solicited through City Council work sessions, a community questionnaire in fall 2021, and several focus group discussions with members from the Aspen Chamber Resort Association, the project team has refined a conceptual plan for possible implementation starting in summer 2022.  

    The City now seeks additional feedback from our community, including residents, commuters, businesses, and visitors, to identify and prioritize challenges and potential solutions to enhance mobility and safety. Additionally, we need your input on a proposed living lab for safety improvements in the Galena Corridor (Galena Street and Cooper Avenue area). 

    We invite you to take this short questionnaire (approx. 7 minutes) to share your thoughts and experiences of traveling in and around Aspen’s downtown core. Information gathered here will be shared with City Council and help inform the decisions made around a living lab planned for implementation in Summer 2022. 

    This survey will close on Wednesday, January 26, 2022, at 5 p.m. 

    Take The Questionnaire
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Page last updated: 22 January 2022, 08:38